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Yongcui Sha

Doctoral student

My previous study is mainly about trophic niches of omnivores in shallow lakes using stable isotope analysis. In aquatic ecosystems, omnivores always show a plastic feeding habits which commonly influenced by habitat modification, prey composition, etc.

Most organisms on Earth live in an environment where they are exposed to multiple and variable threats and one of the most common responses when faced with a threat is to migrate or move away from it. However, most empirical and theoretical studies of resource use and population dynamics treat individual animals as ecologically equivalent. Moreover, variations around the mean behavior have typically regarded as noise rather than an opportunity to gain additional information about individual differences. Since individual behavior plays a key role in the interaction between an organism and its environment, but now such individual consistency often termed “personality” has been studied mainly in higher animals including mammals, birds and fish while our knowledge of individually consistent behavior is still elusive regarding smaller animals, such as invertebrates.

Based on nanotechnology and advanced camera systems, we are able to track multiple mm-sized individuals in three dimensions without affecting their behavior. An individual or clone that dives deep upon exposure to a threat, have a high initial speed but a slow and explorative upward movement after being released from the threat, may be characterized as “shy” whereas the opposite constitutes a “bold” (more risk taking) individual. I will use a combined measure of those features as “refuge demand” which is calculated as the space (integral) defined from the start to the end of the experiment, to see if individual, small sized animals handle fear differently, i.e. if they have “personality” and if perceived fear can be transferred to the next generation. I am also interested in how fear dictates the prey distribution in natural environment.

Publications

Retrieved from Lund University's publications database

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Publications

Retrieved from Lund University's publications database

Publications

Retrieved from Lund University's publications database

Page Manager:
Yongcui Sha
E-mail: yongcui [dot] sha [at] biol [dot] lu [dot] se

Doctoral student

Aquatic ecology

+46 46 222 83 71

E-D112

Sölvegatan 37, Lund

50

Research group

Aquatic Ecology

Projects

 

Supervisors

Main supervisor

Lars-Anders Hansson

Assistant supervisor

Christer Brönmark