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Species-specific dinoflagellate vertical distribution in temperature-stratified waters

Author:
  • Karine Bresolin de Souza
  • Therese Jephson
  • Thomas Berg Hasper
  • Per Carlsson
Publishing year: 2014
Language: English
Pages: 1725-1734
Publication/Series: Marine Biology
Volume: 161
Issue: 8
Document type: Journal article
Publisher: Springer

Abstract english

Thermal stratification is increasing in strength as a result of higher surface water temperature. This could influence the vertical distribution of vertically migrating dinoflagellates. We studied the diel vertical distribution of the dinoflagellates Heterocapsa triquetra and Prorocentrum minimum using stratified laboratory columns with two thermoclines of different strength (Delta TA degrees A = 10 or 17 A degrees C), with below cline temperature of 8 A degrees C. Above the thermocline, nutrient depletion simulated the natural summer conditions in the Baltic Sea. Our study shows that H. triquetra and P. minimum can behave differently in terms of their vertical occurrence, both in space and in time when subjected to thermoclines of different strength. Also, both dinoflagellate species showed species-specific distribution patterns. In the Delta TA degrees A = 10 A degrees C treatment, H. triquetra cells performed a diel vertical migration (DVM) behavior just above the thermocline, but not in the Delta TA degrees A = 17 A degrees C. In the Delta TA degrees A = 17 A degrees C, the cells did not migrate and cell densities in the water column decreased over time. Opposing results were observed for P. minimum, where a DVM pattern was found exclusively below the thermocline of Delta TA degrees A = 17 A degrees C, while in the Delta TA degrees A = 10 A degrees C treatment, no clear DVM pattern was observed, and the highest number of cells were found in the cold bottom water. These results indicate that an increase in thermal stratification can influence species-specific dinoflagellate distribution, behavior, and survival.

Keywords

  • Ecology

Other

Published
  • ISSN: 0025-3162
Per Carlsson
E-mail: per [dot] carlsson [at] biol [dot] lu [dot] se

Senior lecturer

Division aquatic ecology

+46 46 222 84 35

E-C112

50

Senior lecturer

Aquatic Ecology

50

Research group

Aquatic Ecology

Projects

Marine Pelagic Projects

Doctoral students and postdocs

PhD student, main supervisor

Johanna Stedt

Ceratium