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Anne Duplouy

Researcher

Research interests

My main interest is in the ecology and evolution of symbiosis in insects. Symbionts are microorganisms that live in intimate association with their host, they have been described from most Eukaryotes, and they are suggested to infect up to 60% of worldwide insect species. Their ubiquitousness is mainly explained by various means that symbionts have evolved to promote their own fitness, to spread or survive in their host population, and to ensure their transmission through generations (i.e. vertical transmission). The symbiont-induced phenotypes include manipulating the hosts’ reproductive system and other life-history traits, such as host fecundity, dispersal abilities or response to pathogen and environmental extremes. Depending on the study system, the phenotypes are beneficial or costly to the host. Symbiotic system between insects and their associated microorganisms provide ideal models for investigating diverse evolutionary and ecological processes. I started to investigate these topics during the course of my PhD. I have since investigated observed variations in prevalence and penetrance of different strains of the endosymbiotic bacterium Wolbachia pipientis in various natural insect populations. Currently I am investigating how symbiotic micro-organisms may influence insect communities, and how the diverse ecological interactions and phylogenetic relationships between species may facilitate the horizontal transfer of endosymbionts.

About me

I am originally from France, where I did my undergraduate studies (University of Rennes1, & University of St Denis La Reunion) on organismal and ecosystem biology. In 2004, I went to French Polynesia for a summership training period in Conservation Biology. Afterwards I worked as a research assistant at the Gump research station (University of Berkeley California). In 2008 I moved to Brisbane, Australia, to conclude my PhD thesis on the ecology and genomics of a male-killing Wolbachia in a tropical butterfly. I submitted my thesis in 2010. Very shortly after I moved to Helsinki, Finland, to start a postdoc with late Prof. Ilkka Hanski. In September 2013, I was awarded a postdoctoral research grant from the Academy of Finland that allowed me to stay in Helsinki as a PI, and to collaborate with Dr. Amy Truitt at Portland State University in USA. In 2018, I was awarded a Marie-Curie Individual Fellowship to come and work with Prof. Niklas Wahlberg at the Lund University. I investigate diversity and horizontal transfer routes of symbiotic bacteria in Lepidoptera.

Publications

Retrieved from Lund University's publications database

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Publications

Retrieved from Lund University's publications database

Publications

Retrieved from Lund University's publications database

Page Manager:
Anne Duplouy
E-mail: anne [dot] duplouy [at] biol [dot] lu [dot] se

Researcher

Biodiversity

Sölvegatan 37, Lund

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